Free Grant Database!

Demco, a company that sells products for schools and libraries, hosts this free interface for finding grants. It can be hard to find free resources for locating grants to benefit a classroom or a school, so this service is a real benefit! If you have some ideas for your school, but no money to implement your ideas, maybe this database can provide a solution.
[Read more…]

Re-Thinking Homework: Book Review

Article by Michael Ross

In this post, CUES consultant Michael Ross reviews the upcoming guidebook Re-Thinking Homework. We are also offering a new professional development session by the same name on October 20, 2016 – but registration ends on Friday, October 14th. All participants get a copy of this new guidebook. Sign up today!
[Read more…]

New Favorite Tech: ThingLink

Photo courtesy of here.


We live in an age where there is no shortage of online tech for teachers to use in their classrooms – but, sometimes, I stumble across something that strikes me as truly remarkable. Enter ThingLink.
[Read more…]

TenMarks.com: Free Online Math Software

Article by Jenni Stadtmiller, CUES Consultant
When I was teaching fourth grade math, I wanted my homework to provide me with loads of data while not giving me loads of work to gather the data! With 90+ students, grading standards-based homework nightly to gather great data on my students would have added several extra hours of work to my schedule, so I need to come up with a better idea. Enter TenMarks, which offers free online math software.
[Read more…]

Resource: WWC Practice Guides

Whenever I find myself reading an academic article, I try to remember to scour its bibliography. Sometimes, I discover great resources I didn’t know existed. For example, I have known about the “What Works Clearinghouse” (WWC) for quite some time (the government repository for finding whether research supports the effectiveness of certain programs), but I always seemed to navigate to the start page for looking up studies. After reading an article about retention versus social promotion in middle school, I learned the WWC also hosts a series of “Practice Guides.” If you haven’t already found them, the What Works Clearinghouse Practice Guides are dynamic resources!
[Read more…]

Graphic Organizers and Struggling Readers

For years, no one ever explained to me the point of graphic organizers.  I remember, when I was a high school student, how I hated when my English teacher would force us to complete things like a “semantic web.”  I just wanted to start writing, but instead I’d be forced to put words inside circles, connecting them with lines.  I didn’t get it.  So when I became an English teacher, I refused to waste time on such activities.  I made the common mistake of universalizing my own experience, figuring my students would appreciate being spared the irritation I felt at their age.
[Read more…]

Review: NowComment.com for Close Reading

NowComment.com offers a no-strings, totally free service to facilitate detailed discussions about texts – and this is a great resource for teachers seeking to engage students in deep analysis. Students can use the interface to do a close reading of a poem, a passage from literature, a historical document, an informational article, or even a math word problem.
[Read more…]

Review: ReadWorks.org

Are you trying to increase literacy across content areas? If so, you probably want to bookmark ReadWorks.org right now! Of the site’s features, this powerful search interface really sets these free literacy resources above the rest.
[Read more…]

Review: CK12.org for Math and Science

If you haven’t clicked on CK12.org for Math or Science content, do yourself a favor and bookmark the site immediately. Accounts are free, and the available content is high quality and dynamic. For me, the beauty of CK12.org happens after I click on a content area and look at the list of available topics. Check out, for example, this link for CK12’s Algebra offerings. The sheer volume of topics from which to choose is quite impressive.
[Read more…]

Recasting the “At-Risk” Student

When I first read this item from Education Week, I immediately thought of a former colleague, an urban principal, who had the same idea a few years earlier: he identified the most “at-risk” boys and girls in our high school, and then invited them to monthly meetings (the “Boys Leadership Team” and the “Girls Leadership Team”). The idea was to see if imagining students in a different context (and if getting them to see themselves in a different context) could lead to a transformation.
[Read more…]